Pauline Hanson continues refusal to censure Senator Anning in Griffith

SPECIAL GUEST: Upper House candidate Rod Roberts, One Nation leader Pauline Hanson and Murray candidate Tom Weyrich on Banna Avenue on Tuesday. PHOTO: Jacinta Dickins
SPECIAL GUEST: Upper House candidate Rod Roberts, One Nation leader Pauline Hanson and Murray candidate Tom Weyrich on Banna Avenue on Tuesday. PHOTO: Jacinta Dickins

"If they get away with censuring Fraser Anning, who is the next one? Me?"

One Nation's leader Pauline Hanson has refused to let her visit to Griffith on Tuesday be marred by her refusal to censure Fraser Anning's "abhorrent" comments over the Christchurch terror attack.

Ms Hanson has come under fire this week for refusing to vote in the censure of the senator - a position he got under the One Nation ticket - saying to do so would go against her belief in Australia's democracy and free speech.

"He has wanted to come back to our party but I have refused to have him - on three occasions. I don't want a bar of the man and I do not in any way, shape or form have any respect for what he says and how he says it.

"But he is a member of parliament and it is not up to me or other members of parliament to censure him. It is the voters that will decide, and it should be voters who decide.

"It sets that precedent to censure people who don't support their agenda."

Meeting with One Nations' candidate for Murray Tom Weyrich and joined by Upper House candidate Rod Roberts on Banna Avenue, Ms Hanson fielded fans and supporters as she attempted to finish off a pie from Bertoldo's bakery.

"That's the overwhelming response I get when I visit regional communities like Griffith, like I have had today," she said.

"People who know what we actually stand for and recognise the importance of what we are fighting to protect appreciate having a voice for Australia."

Ms Hanson has had long-standing accusations of racism and even being likened to a "white supremacist" by senator Darryn Hinch on 7's Sunrise this week.

Yet she says she doesn't have to combat those views when visiting and campaigning in areas with a strong multicultural background, like Griffith and the MIA, because these accusations are "simply not true".

"This has been used as a tool to actually destroy One Nation credibility," she hits back.

"To speak about the issue of immigration is not racist, because the public want debate in these areas. But because these politicians have their own agenda, they want to shut down anyone like myself who opens up debate to give the people a voice."

She says her party has strong multicultural diversity in it's ranks, and with non-white candidates standing in NSW, QLD and WA now and in the past, she's "probably had the most multicultural party going, to tell you the honest truth."