Pythons positive despite a difficult year in Oilsplus Cup North

The Canowindra Pythons will be looking to bounce back and put up a strong showing for the final game of the season on July 20. Photo: Kelsey Sutor

The Canowindra Pythons will be looking to bounce back and put up a strong showing for the final game of the season on July 20. Photo: Kelsey Sutor

While the Canowindra Pythons failed to field a team - and not for the first time - last weekend against the Wellington Redbacks president Jack Beath has backed the club in to get numbers on the park for the final game of the year.

"We had a fair few blokes out with injuries, that are all pretty keen to come back for our last game," he explained, the final fixture a Saturday home game against the Yeoval Eagles on July 20.

"We've [also] got a few other local blokes that have played a few home games for us that sort of want to have a bit more of a run.

"By the looks of it, we should have a pretty handy team... hopefully."

While Beath acknowledges it hasn't always been the easiest of times on-field, he firmly believes, in keeping with his aims to make the club a more social venue, it has had plenty of success this year, the inclusion of a combined women's team with Cowra one of many important steps forward.

"As a club... we've had a bloody good year, a very successful ladies' day and a very successful members and sponsors' day and we've had some real good nights at the club house.

"There's a very good feeling around the club. We've got plenty of young people, they've come especially into the committee this year, which is a positive thing," he explained.

Meanwhile, in terms of the challenges that exist for small rugby clubs in the bush, Beath was careful not to lay the blame at the Central West Rugby Union or Rugby NSW, saying he doesn't think they "could do anymore" for his club.

"Matt Tink [CEO of Central West Rugby], he's been awesome. He's a really good bloke and he's very, very understanding of what goes on in bush footy," Beath said.

"You've only got to look at the Walla Rugbys and your younger grades... they're still very strong."

However, he does believe there is a disconnect between the national administration of the game and its grass roots, believing that more development programs at school level, as well as greater awareness of the SuperRugby brand, are needed in country areas, especially to keep pace with the likes of the NRL and AFL.

"[They] probably are missing the eight-ball a bit," the president summarised.

Nevertheless, Beath is keen to ensure that his club continues to remain involved in the community, whether that be through rentals of its buses to local hospitals and schools or members volunteering at local events.

"If you want the community to get behind you... you've gotta get out and back the community as a club," the president said.

"It's a two-way street.

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