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COVID-19 Informer: South Koreans try QR codes for tracking, Parisians enjoy cafes again

All around the world debates are continuing on the best ways to re-open countries and resume 'the new normal' without seeing a big jump in coronavirus cases.

In the UK, the government is facing opposition to its policy of quarantining all arrivals to the UK, reports The Times.

Easyjet has announced it will resume the majority of its flight network in under two months, with Conservative MPs warning the two-week isolation period was unworkable and could devastate the travel industry.

In France, and Parisians can rejoice in the cafe culture that makes its city famous again, although with a strict set of rules.

Social distancing of one metre between tables will be required, reducing capacity in some outside areas by half.

The Guardian is reporting South Korea will begin trying out QR codes as part of track-and-trace efforts. Visitors to nightclubs, indoor gyms that hold group classes and others will be required to use an app which generates a one-time personalised QR code that can be scanned at the door.

Japan has reopened the gardens at its Imperial Palace after a two-month closure to the public.

Visitor numbers are limited to 50 people each in the morning and afternoon.

In Pakistan, Prime Minister, Imran Khan, has defended his decision to lift almost all lockdown measures because of economic losses, despite rising numbers of cases, The Guardian reports.

Let's have a quick look at the figures from John Hopkins, global COVID-19 cases sit at more than 6.2 million.

The US has the highest number of cases with 1.8m and 105,644 deaths. Brazil has 526,447 cases and 29,937 deaths; Russia has 423,186 cases.

The UK has 279,391 cases and 39,451 deaths. Italy 233,515 cases and 33,530 deaths and Spain has 239,932 cases.

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This story South Korea trials QR codes for tracking, Parisians enjoy cafes again first appeared on The Canberra Times.