Robinson stands by spray despite NRL fine

Roosters coach Trent Robinson has defended comments which saw him slapped with a suspended fine.
Roosters coach Trent Robinson has defended comments which saw him slapped with a suspended fine.

Trent Robinson wouldn't change his words despite copping a $10,000 breach notice for labelling an NRL officials process 'incompetent' on Friday night.

The Sydney Roosters coach was shocked to be handed the suspended fine by the NRL, which is usually reserved for coaches who question the integrity of officials.

The NRL itself has admitted that process broke down prior to halftime in the Roosters' controversial loss to Parramatta at Bankwest Stadium, saying Dylan Brown and Marata Niukore should have been sin-binned for acts of foul play.

The league has also agreed it was unacceptable for Brown not to be placed on report until after halftime, and that Robinson didn't find out he had a free interchange until 20 minutes after the incident.

The cluster of incidents caused mass controversy over the weekend and while Robinson was happy with how the NRL has dealt with it, he was stunned to be fined.

"It's been hard for me to understand that, I wouldn't have changed the press conference that I gave," he said.

"I can understand the rules around the integrity of the refs but questioning the process was fair and justified and if they believe that that's a breach, then it's a breach, but I wouldn't have changed anything that I said in that press conference."

Following the 31-18 loss, the Roosters coach fumed over the breakdown of process in the bunker after the NRL had days before reminded officials to use the sin bin.

Robinson didn't call out specific officials or players, but questioned why they did not see the obvious acts of foul play.

Brown has copped a three-week suspension for the contact that hospitalised Drew Hutchison, while Niukore will serve two weeks for a high shot on James Tedesco.

"I gave my views on that and that wasn't to their liking," Robinson said.

"But, it's been backed up by what the NRL has done in relation to those incidents. That's life.

"I didn't question any of the officials on that day, I questioned the process that they took right from the end of the first half until after halftime and they've done the same thing, the NRL has gone through processes this week.

"What I questioned, they've questioned.

"And I imagine they've got to a result.

"They've worked really hard this week from what they've said and good on them.

"But I'm here to give some commentary on my view of the game and I think censorship, when it's done in the right way, and I feel like I did that, is not really what our game wants."

This week the NRL has again reminded officials to use the sin bin at minimum for acts of foul play, especially when it's contact to the head or neck.

Australian Associated Press